Category Archives: Film Ruminations

A Film Rumination: Eccentricities of a Blonde-haired Girl, Manoel de Oliveira (2009)

7.5/10 (Good)

The Portuguese master Manoel de Oliveira is the oldest filmaker still making films — he’s 102 at the moment!  Even more surprising is the fact that his most productive years have come since the 1990s (often two films a year).  Eccentricities of a Blonde-haired Girl (2009) is the first of his I’ve seen and won’t be my last.  Despite the fact that Eccentricities has its fair share of flaws it is a gorgeous and timeless tale Continue reading A Film Rumination: Eccentricities of a Blonde-haired Girl, Manoel de Oliveira (2009)

A Film Rumination: Sidney Lumet (June 25, 1924-April 9, 2011) and mini-reviews of the films of his I’ve seen

The great American director Sidney Lumet (1924-2011) passed away today and in honor of his long and productive  career (albeit with brief lulls of average work) here are a few mini-reviews of the films of his I’ve seen in order of preference. I’ve not seen many of his acknowledged masterpieces including Serpico, The Hill, Long Day’s Journey Into Night, The Pawnbroker, etc.

1. Network (1976)

9.5/10 (Masterpiece)

Network (1976) is by far my favorite Sidney Lumet film Continue reading A Film Rumination: Sidney Lumet (June 25, 1924-April 9, 2011) and mini-reviews of the films of his I’ve seen

A (short) Film Rumination: The Airship Destroyer (variant title: The Battle in the Clouds), Walter R. Booth (1909)

8/10 (Very Good)

tagline (a remarkably prescient one): “War in the Air! Possibilities of the Future! And actual motion picture prediction of the ideas of Rudyard Kipling, H. G. Wells, Jules Verne, and other powerful writers of imaginative fiction.  Shows what might happen in the near future Continue reading A (short) Film Rumination: The Airship Destroyer (variant title: The Battle in the Clouds), Walter R. Booth (1909)

A Film Rumination: The Monolith Monsters, John Sherwood (1957)


7/10 (Good)

John Sherwood’s The Monolith Monsters (1957) is by far one of my favorite  B sci-fi (ish) monster movies!  I’m being very generous with rating but, this is a hilariously average (but wonderful) romp with one of the more peculiar “monsters” matched up with some of the best 50s special effects I’ve seen.  The Monolith Monsters is without doubt one of the more interesting films of the 1950s American Realist Science Fiction movement Continue reading A Film Rumination: The Monolith Monsters, John Sherwood (1957)

A Film Rumination: Journey to the Far Side of the Sun (variant title: Doppelgänger), Robert Parrish (1969)

5/10 (Average)

Robert Parrish’s Journey to the Far Side of the Sun is a British science fiction film of average quality.  The first two thirds are well done before the final act kicks into gear with all its hokeyness and painfully glitzy camera work.  The central “idea” is on the surface an intriguing one Continue reading A Film Rumination: Journey to the Far Side of the Sun (variant title: Doppelgänger), Robert Parrish (1969)

A (short) Film Rumination: La Charcuterie Méchanique (The Mechanical Butcher), Auguste and Louis Lumière (1895)

The brothers Auguste and Louis Lumière were two of the earliest and most influential film directors. La Charcuterie Méchanique (1895), considered one of the earliest “sc-fi” films of all time, predicts the mechanical butcher.  A rather simple machine “transforms” a pig into Continue reading A (short) Film Rumination: La Charcuterie Méchanique (The Mechanical Butcher), Auguste and Louis Lumière (1895)

A Film Rumination: A Sunday in the Country, Bertrand Tavernier (1984)

7/10 (Good)

The famous French director Bertrand Tavernier has produced some remarkable films (Coup de Torchon and Life and Nothing But for example).  A Sunday in the Country is considered by many to be among his best.  My opinion is more tempered — if you’re in the mood for a minimalist family drama in the beautiful French countryside without much “drama” Continue reading A Film Rumination: A Sunday in the Country, Bertrand Tavernier (1984)