Tag Archives: experimental

Adventures in Science Fiction Cover Art: A Selection of Vincent Di Fate’s early 70s Covers

(Cover for the 1972 edition of Plunder (1972), Ron Goulart)

The covers of Vincent Di Fate (1945-) often evoke a Terry Gilliam-esque romp — for example, Ron Goulart’s Plunder — a lone facade and a house dot a purple and green plain, mountains emerge in the distance, planets pepper the sky, a head floats ominously, a bizarre reptilian creature in a boatie rides an antique bicycle.  I desperately want to know if it’s a scene from the book.  If so, I’m tracking down a copy!

Vincent Di Fate’s work graced a few of the great works of the genre Continue reading Adventures in Science Fiction Cover Art: A Selection of Vincent Di Fate’s early 70s Covers

(mini) Film Ruminations: The Tree of Life (2011), Super 8 (2011), A Serious Man (2010), etc.

I do not write reviews for the majority of films I watch.  My reasons are somewhat nebulous considering it’s the summer and I certainly have time.  I see my blog more as a way to re-examine and bring to the forefront sci-fi books and films generally more esoteric and infrequently reviewed.  But certain winds shift direction for brief windows of time.  So here we go, a rundown of the more popular films I’ve seen in theater or re-watched recently.

The Tree of Life (2011), dir. Terrence Malick, rating 7.75/10 (Good)

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Terrence Malick’s The Tree of Life (2011) juxtaposes extensive sequences Continue reading (mini) Film Ruminations: The Tree of Life (2011), Super 8 (2011), A Serious Man (2010), etc.

Book Review: And Chaos Died, Joanna Russ (1970)

4.5/5 (Very Good)

Nominated for the 1970 Nebula Award for Best Novel

“The ground was covered with old names…” (76)

Joanna Russ, famous for her feminist sci-fi novel The Female Man (1975), weaves together a bizarre (and difficult) novel filled with strange images, peculiar characters, and a fragmented/layered/bewildering narrative structure.  And Chaos Died (1970) is a startlingly original take on the staple sci-fi Continue reading Book Review: And Chaos Died, Joanna Russ (1970)

A (short) Film Rumination: La Charcuterie Méchanique (The Mechanical Butcher), Auguste and Louis Lumière (1895)

The brothers Auguste and Louis Lumière were two of the earliest and most influential film directors. La Charcuterie Méchanique (1895), considered one of the earliest “sc-fi” films of all time, predicts the mechanical butcher.  A rather simple machine “transforms” a pig into Continue reading A (short) Film Rumination: La Charcuterie Méchanique (The Mechanical Butcher), Auguste and Louis Lumière (1895)

Two (Short) Film Ruminations: Le Diable Noir (1905), Un Homme de Têtes (1898), Georges Méliès

The French director Georges Méliès (1861-1938) is rightly famous for his innovative use of special effects.  He’s credited with inventing time-lapse photography, multiple exposures, stop-trick, and dissolves.  I’ve selected two outrageously fun short films of his.  He’s most famous for the sci-fi classic Voyage to the Moon, but any cinema lover will enjoy these two pieces of cinematic history.

Le Diable Noir (1905)

Continue reading Two (Short) Film Ruminations: Le Diable Noir (1905), Un Homme de Têtes (1898), Georges Méliès

A Film Rumination: The Hypothesis of the Stolen Painting, Raoul Ruiz (1979)

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8/10 (Very Good — read the friendly warnings before you embark….)

We enter, from the street, a sprawling house occupied by a single long-winded art collector of dubious authority and his proliferation of mannequins and silent helpers Continue reading A Film Rumination: The Hypothesis of the Stolen Painting, Raoul Ruiz (1979)