A Film Rumination: Tales from the Gimli Hospital, Guy Maddin (1988)

8/10 (Very Good)

Guy Maddin’s first feature film is a spectacle to behold.  A classic sort of frame story devolves (positively) into a dreamlike wandering in an alternative Iceland, with strange preachers, bark fish, a woman discovered on the shore wrapped in nets, young girls floating down rivers in coffins…  Maddin manipulates silent black-and Continue reading

A Film (documentary) Rumination: The Atomic Cafe, Jayne Loader, Kevin Rafferty (1982)

8/10 (Very Good)

Atomic Cafe (1982) is a scathing documentary on the atomic age created from archival film from the 40s-early 60s.  The scope of the material is extensive: military training films (often the most morbidly hilarious and poorly acted of the bunch), television news, various other government-produced propaganda films Continue reading

Two (Short) Film Ruminations: Le Diable Noir (1905), Un Homme de Têtes (1898), Georges Méliès

The French director Georges Méliès (1861-1938) is rightly famous for his innovative use of special effects.  He’s credited with inventing time-lapse photography, multiple exposures, stop-trick, and dissolves.  I’ve selected two outrageously fun short films of his.  He’s most famous for the sci-fi classic Voyage to the Moon, but any cinema lover will enjoy these two pieces of cinematic history.

Le Diable Noir (1905)

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