Tag Archives: 1970s

Update: Recent Science Fiction Acquisitions N. VIII

My month of infrequent posts is over — I’ve returned to Austin after a month long sojourn across Colorado, New Mexico, France and Italy….  So, what do I do in my jet lagged state?  Head to the Half Price Books.  Not the best haul this time but a few potentially interesting reads.

1. Witch World (1963), Andre Norton

I’ve yet to read any of Andre Norton’s immense number of novels.  Not knowing exactly where to start I picked up what is generally considered among her best works — Witch World (1963).  It was nominated for the 1964 Hugo award for Best novel and often places in best Fantasy/Sci-fi lists.  And the cover is Continue reading Update: Recent Science Fiction Acquisitions N. VIII

Updates: Recent Science Fiction Acquisitions N. VII

Austin’s Half Price Books will be my downfall.  I’ve broken my promise not to buy any more science fiction books this summer…

1. The Big Jump (1955), Leigh Brackett (MY REVIEW)

I’ve yet to read a work by the famous female sci-fi writer and screenwriter (The Big Sleep, The Empire Strikes Back, Rio Bravo, El Dorado) Leigh Brackett.  I look forward to this “pulp” work with great Continue reading Updates: Recent Science Fiction Acquisitions N. VII

Adventures in Science Fiction Cover Art: Gino D’Achille and small greenish men stealing large reddish women

While browsing through the spectacular collection of DAW sci-fi/fantasy covers between the 60s-80s on the Internet Speculative Fiction Database  I came across Ian Wallace’s The Lucifer Comet (1980).  I know nothing about the work itself (or the author) but something about the shoddy cover immediately rung a bell.  I had seen a similar small greenish man (but without wings) hoisting an unprotesting much heavier scantily clad reddish Continue reading Adventures in Science Fiction Cover Art: Gino D’Achille and small greenish men stealing large reddish women

Book Review: A Billion Days of Earth, Doris Piserchia (1976)

4.25/5 (Very Good)

Doris Piserchia’s A Billion Days of Earth (1976) is a whimsical, disturbing, and stunningly inventive science fiction novel.  This is the second and by far the best of her novels I’ve read (A Billion Days of Earth surpasses Doomtime (1981) in virtually every regard).  Not only are the characters better drawn but the plot isn’t as easily derailed by repetitious actions.  That said, she isn’t always the best at plotting but her imaginative worldscapes and bizarre creatures more than compensate.   Continue reading Book Review: A Billion Days of Earth, Doris Piserchia (1976)

Updates: Recent Science Fiction Acquisitions N. VI

I’ve held to my promise not to buy any more books this summer considering I have at least 40 unread sci-fi books looming over my shoulder.   However, other people are welcome to procure books FOR me! And they have — all of the following were gifts! Thank you!

1. The Last Starship from Earth (1968), John Boyd (MY REVIEW)

I’ve read multiple reviews which claim that John Boyd’s The Last Starship from Earth is a lost classic.  However, opinion are far from unanimous (for example, the sci-fi author Joanna Russ wrote a scathing review blaming the publishers for subjecting her and fellow readers to Continue reading Updates: Recent Science Fiction Acquisitions N. VI

Egregious Science Fiction Cover Art: The Jaws That Bite, The Claws That Catch (1975), Michael G. Coney

I nominate the cover of Michael G. Coney’s The Jaws That Bite, The Claws That Catch (1975) as the worst I’ve ever seen.  I’ve submitted it to Good Show Sir so hopefully it gets posted on that hilarious website soon.  Kelly Freas is considered one of the best sci-fi artists Continue reading Egregious Science Fiction Cover Art: The Jaws That Bite, The Claws That Catch (1975), Michael G. Coney

Sci-Fi TV Episode Reviews: Space: 1999, episode 3, ‘Black Sun’ (1975)

4/10 (Bad)

One might ask: how do you eviscerate a promising concept/episode?  I would answer simply, resolve it with a Cosmic Intelligence.  It’s easy!  Characters accidentally placed on the other side of the galaxy by the script, just swish them back to square one with Mr. (Mrs?) Cosmic Intelligence.

Did your characters accidentally get scripted into an uncompromising position (let’s say, heading straight for a Black (hole) Sun)?  If the answer is yes, Continue reading Sci-Fi TV Episode Reviews: Space: 1999, episode 3, ‘Black Sun’ (1975)