Adventures in Science Fiction Cover Art: Ice-Covered Cities, Part II

(Steve Crisp’s cover for the 1985 edition of The World in Winter (variant title: The Long Winter) (1962), John Christopher)

Hello fellow vintage SF fans!

I have for you Part II of my Ice-Covered Cities SF art post series–check out Part I (posted way back in 2012).  In Part I, I discussed the allure of the apocalyptic scenario of a coming Ice Age, inspired by my read through of John Carpenter’s odd black comedy The Long Winter (variant title: The Winter of the World) (1962). SF artists love destroying famous landmarks and a coming ice disaster is yet another exciting visual strategy for destroying urban symbology. Unsurprisingly, New York City (Twin Towers) and London (Big Ben) feature predominately.

Steve Crisp’s cover for the 1985 edition of John Christopher’s The World in Winter (variant title: The Long Winter) (1962) and Lou Feck’s cover for the 1st edition of Arnold Federbush’s Ice! (1978) are my absolute favorites. Feck’s colors and lighting are evoke, in gorgeous strokes, the urban transformation caused by the extreme cold descended on Manhattan (and probably is far superior to the contents of the novel).

Are the novels worth reading? Alidss’ Helliconia sequence is quite well-known. I have Pangborn’s Davy (1964) on the shelf. Have a favorite cover?

Note: there are most likely quite a few more examples that fit the theme. If you include a link to another cover (stick to 80s covers and earlier), I might include it in a Part III.

Enjoy!

(Colin Hay’s cover for the 1976 edition of Davy (1964), Edgar Pangborn)

(Lou Feck’s cover for the 1st edition of Ice! (1978), Arnold Federbush)

(Eddie Jones’ cover for the 1980 German edition of Ice! (1978), Arnold Federbush)

(Heinrichs & Piloty’s cover for the 1964 German edition of We Who Survived (1959), Sterling Noel)

(Uncredited cover for the 1978 edition of The World in Winter (variant title: The Long Winter) (1962), John Christopher)

(Hans Pieko’s cover for the 1st edition of Helliconia Winter (1985), Brian Aldiss)

(Tim Gill’s cover for the 1986 edition of Helliconia Winter (1985), Brian Aldiss)

(Oliviero Berni’s cover for the 1986 edition of Helliconia Winter (1985), Brian Aldiss)

(Gilbert Raffin’s cover for the 1982 French edition of The Sixth Winter (1979), John Gribbin and Douglas Orgill)

(Gilbert Raffin’s cover for the 1986 French edition of The Sixth Winter (1979), John Gribbin and Douglas Orgill)

(David Plourde’s cover for the 1981 edition of The Sixth Winter (1979), John Gribbin and Douglas Orgill)

For more cover art posts consult the INDEX

For book reviews consult the INDEX

12 thoughts on “Adventures in Science Fiction Cover Art: Ice-Covered Cities, Part II”

  1. I do actually have Ice — it looks bad but next January, in the frigid winter, I may read it. (That’s when I always get the Ice Age books out.)

    Wolves, new Ice Ages, and Inuit characters (or, at least, references to Inuit) are put together a lot a la the Sixth Winter (and, for that matter, that dreadful movie The Day After Tomorrow). As I recall Richard Moran’s The Empire of Ice also has them.

    And I see the cover for The Sixth Winter has that all time popular symbol of disaster: the Statue of Liberty used, I believe, starting in the 19th century.

    1. Link a review when you write it!

      I think Federbush’s only other SF novel, The Man Who Lived in Inner Space (1973), other than its fascinating cover, has a fun premise — man adapted to live in oceans, i.e. “Earth’s inner space.” It is also supposed be something of a New Wave romp… suspicious, but I’d read it.

        1. Yeah, the Lou Feck cover for Ice! is head over shoulders better than what he usually produced…. He had a 50s pulp vibe most of the time.

          Although, I do love his Star Trek covers!

          and….

      1. I really liked The Man Who Lived in Inner Space and read it a couple of times at least after I bought it (it is very short!) But the science n it is very iffy! It got culled years ago…

    2. I’ve curated two posts on The Statue of Liberty (I’ve found additional covers that fit the theme since I’ve put them together) — and yes, often paired with scenes of destruction.

      Part I: https://sciencefictionruminations.com/2012/10/01/adventures-in-science-fiction-cover-art-the-statue-of-liberty/

      Part II: https://sciencefictionruminations.com/2013/08/08/adventures-in-science-fiction-cover-art-the-statue-of-liberty-on-pre-1968-magazine-and-novel-covers-part-ii/#more-8891

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